Component Video CableA Component video cable is a very high quality cable capable of passing masses of video data from a compatible source such as a DVD player to a compatible television or projector. They normally have three phono/RCA connectors on each coloured red, green and blue, and each carry a different component of the video signal. They are often confused with the similarly named (but far worse quality) composite cable.

Component cables are normally used for analogue video connections but they are more than capable of handling the large amounts of data that a digital high definition signal requires, including a full 1080p high definition signal. However, because of legal and security issues most manufacturers of televisions and blu-ray players will not allow a full 1080p signal to be passed down a component cable, restricting them to 720p or 1080i. This means to get the full HD benefit, an HDMI cable is your best option, and is one of the reasons that the component cable is not as popular as it once was.

How Much To Spend?

As they become rarer, good quality component cables are actually increasing in price but you can spend anything from £6 to £120 depending on length and quality. Like all cables we would recommend you buy a well made cable so it will last as long as possible.

Where to Buy Component Cables

There are a number of specialist home cinema cable suppliers as listed below:

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One Comment to “Component Cable Buyers Guide”

tripod on September 10, 2009 said:

Components cables are basically used for video connections but these cables are not able to trnsmit large amount of data so this is the limitation of these cables and most of the people prefer HDMI cables.

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